Tag Archives: bluetooth

Forensics Analysis of goTenna

Intro Two prominent conversations still exist as important considerations in the digital age: the privacy of personal information and the geographical limitations of certain commercial cell networks. This is where goTenna comes in: goTenna is an “off-the-grid” communications tool which interfaces with mobile devices via Bluetooth. GoTenna devices are able to create private cell networks […]

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Bluetooth Vulnerability Assessment 3.0

Analysis On Bluetooth Vulnerability Assessment 3.0 The Bluetooth Team is beginning to wind down and finalize our culminating report, but we have still made tremendous progress since our last blog. Our Btlejuice Team has been able to solve their previous issue with the Schlage Sense Smart Deadbolt, which caused the lock to disappear from the […]

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Bluetooth Vulnerability Assessment 2.0

Bluetooth Vulnerability Assessment 2.0 The Bluetooth Team has been hard at work using the tools previously gathered to assess – and exploit – vulnerabilities in the wireless connectivity protocol. With Pwnie Express’s BlueHydra and Econocom Digital Security’s Btlejuice installed on each of the two team’s  respective laptop, we have begun our analysis of current Bluetooth […]

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Bluetooth Vulnerability Assessment

Bluetooth Security With popular television shows like CSI Cyber and Mr. Robot showcasing cybercriminals exploiting Bluetooth to gain access to their victims’ devices, Bluetooth security has become increasingly popular in the consumer market. But do you really know how safe you are from Bluetooth attacks?   Analysis Bluetooth is a wireless protocol that works by […]

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Bluetooth Security Final Blog

Introduction Over the past seven weeks, our team at the Leahy Center for Digital Investigation has been working to discover the inherent vulnerabilities in Bluetooth security technology. We have wrapped up the research portion of our project and have begun running tests on our devices. Over the next several weeks we will continue to run […]

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